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Author Topic: Experiments with patches - online resources  (Read 435 times)

Franco1964

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Experiments with patches - online resources
« on: December 19, 2018, 03:10:29 pm »
Hi,

I have purchased Pigments yesterday. I'm new to the world of software synthetizers, and I have a couple of quetions.

I'm interested in replicate the sounds of synths used in late '60 and '70 progressive band (Genesis, EL&P, King Crimson, Premiata Forneria Marconi...). Most of them use Moog analog synth or similar. There is an online repository that show how can set oscillators and filters used in their songs?

I've found this on the web:

http://www.synthzone.com/midi/moog/minimoog/MINIMOOG%20PATCH%20BOOK.pdf

but I don't know well how can I map the Minimoog commands in Pigments to replicate the original sound (especially the far left sets of knobs, named "Controllers" in the pdf). Can you help me and also tell if there are other online sources?

Another question: can I import sampled sounds in Pingments wavetable and work with it trying to emulate Mellotron sounds?

MajorFubar

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Re: Experiments with patches - online resources
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2018, 03:43:46 pm »
For over 15 years Arturia have been making VSTs to emulate vintage gear, including the Moog Modular and Mini Moog, but you go pick the one VST they've ever made that's deliberately tailored towards making modern and futuristic sounds, and you want to make vintage sounds with it.

Sorry that wasn't a particularly helpful answer, but I just found it ironic.
2011 iMac 27" 2013 MBP 13" V Collection 6 Analog Lab 4 KeyLab 88 KeyLab 49 KeyStep

Franco1964

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Re: Experiments with patches - online resources
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2018, 04:01:23 pm »
For over 15 years Arturia have been making VSTs to emulate vintage gear, including the Moog Modular and Mini Moog, but you go pick the one VST they've ever made that's deliberately tailored towards making modern and futuristic sounds, and you want to make vintage sounds with it.

I'm a newbie, and I want to experiment with all the possibilites of Pigments. The one I described isn't possible?

LBH

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Re: Experiments with patches - online resources
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2018, 04:47:18 pm »
Hi and welcome to Arturia synth.

Pigments is actually good in creating vintage sounds too. To me it's a very good allround synth, with the use of modulation in focus.

Both Arturias V-Collection that emulate vintage synths and Pigments can create or get close tto the sounds you search - i assume. Some sounds might call for a certain synth.

Even if you find some sound charts that show certain settings, then you might not get the same sound, when you dial in the same settings.
You will not be able to find a translator for settings on for example a Minimoog sound chart to settings in Pigments, if that is what you mean.

Don't exspect to find any of the bands own settings. But for example some soundpacks from Arturia for V-Collection does emulate some vintage sounds. But if it's for you, or you think they get close enough, i can't tell.
Also many vintage sounds is included in the V-Collection and in Analog Lab. Analog Lab can also run the soundpacks from Arturias soundstore.

Noone can just tell you how to - unless they recreate the sounds them self. So exspect to begin to learn how to make the sounds you wan't, by using your synth.
You can also wish for certain sounds, that someone, then might create and sell or give away.

Pigments does'nt use samples as such - like a sampler does. It can import wavetables that's also samlpes, but thats not the same.
Two synths in the V-Collection can use sound samples - Synclavier V and CMI V. But again, you need the correct samples and settings.
You can get close to some Mellotron sounds using some synths. Also there are sampler instruments on the market that have Mellotron sounds.

What Controls at the far left of Pigments are you talking about? Please post an image, if it's still relevant.

I don't think i cam answer this in a different way.

MajorFubar

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Re: Experiments with patches - online resources
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2018, 05:01:44 pm »
For over 15 years Arturia have been making VSTs to emulate vintage gear, including the Moog Modular and Mini Moog, but you go pick the one VST they've ever made that's deliberately tailored towards making modern and futuristic sounds, and you want to make vintage sounds with it.

I'm a newbie, and I want to experiment with all the possibilites of Pigments. The one I described isn't possible?
Sorry I didn't mean to sound off putting, and as LBH says above, there's no real reason you can't get the sounds you want from the new synth. I just can't figure out why you went for it when you have already said you're looking for vintage sounds, so you bypassed 21 VSTs in Arturia's arsenal of vintage instruments (including both Moog and Mini Moog VSTs) in favour of this one.

Best advice I can give is watch a few YouTube videos about how subtractive synthesis works to try to give you an idea of how to use the controls in the analog part of Pigments. Also download the demo of Analog Lab, which would have cost you same price as Pigments and comes with 6,500 presets across all 21 vintage instruments.

Really really wished you'd actually asked here first rather than dropping the dough on a VST that's less ideally suited to your needs than most of their others.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2018, 05:08:47 pm by MajorFubar »
2011 iMac 27" 2013 MBP 13" V Collection 6 Analog Lab 4 KeyLab 88 KeyLab 49 KeyStep

JDoo

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Re: Experiments with patches - online resources
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2018, 03:09:45 am »
I'd recommend watching (listening to - actually) youtube videos of folks going through the included presets.  You can do that, while you're browsing the internet, or doing something else.  When you hear a tone that is close to a classic sound you want..  look at the video and write down the patch that is playing.  Later - you can bring up those patches in Pigments, and experiment changing the filter, resonance, waveform bits, etc..  It's easy - and it's a good way to learn.   Here is one to get you started:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLGFuRgKsks     G'luck -

Franco1964

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Re: Experiments with patches - online resources
« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2018, 02:06:16 pm »


Best advice I can give is watch a few YouTube videos about how subtractive synthesis works to try to give you an idea of how to use the controls in the analog part of Pigments. Also download the demo of Analog Lab, which would have cost you same price as Pigments and comes with 6,500 presets across all 21 vintage instruments.


Hi, I've purchased Pigments because I want to experiment with all the possibillities that a synth can obtain. But I also think that an "historical" approach helps me to understand all the possibilities without holes and unwanted forward leaps.
As I know, Pigments is the best product now, at an affordable price, for doing that. Starting with "old sound" is only my personal approach to fully understand things.

 

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